CURRICULUM VITAE

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About that button…

It's a campaign button made for Joseph William Martin Jr. (no relation) a US Representative from Massachusetts who served from 1925 until 1967, including as the 44th Speaker of the House. This 1959 article from The Harvard Crimson, "The Fall of Joe Martin," documents some of his trials and tribulations in government. Thought I have reason to suspect that Joe Martin and I would have had our differences, I do have some affection for this button. Its wording, of course, provides a tidy summation of the goal of any CV. But it's also an endearing piece of material culture from the era I study.


EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT

CURRENT APPOINTMENT
2017–
Teaching Associate
, History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge

EDUCATION
PhD, 2013
History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, University of Minnesota

MA, 2011       
Philosophy, University of Minnesota

BA, 2006       
Independent Concentration in History and Philosophy of Science, Cum Laude, University Professors Program, Boston University

PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS
2016–2017     
National Science Foundation Research Scholar and Fellow-in-Residence, Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Visiting Research Fellow, University of Leeds, Centre for History and Philosophy of Science

2014–2016     
Assistant Professor (fixed-term), Michigan State University, Lyman Briggs College, History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science

2013–2014     
Faculty Fellow, Colby College, Science, Technology, and Society


PUBLICATIONS

Monograph

Solid State Insurrection: How the Science of Substance Made American Physics Matter. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018.
 

Research Articles and Book Chapters

  1. Negotiating History: Contingency, Canonicity, and Case Studies.Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A (2019): in press. Co-authored with Agnes Bolinska.

  2. “Mildred Dresselhaus and Solid State Pedagogy at MIT.” Annalen der Physik 531 (2019): in press.

  3. “Cultural Scaffolding and Technological Change.” In Beyond the Meme: Development and Structure in Cultural Evolution, Minnesota Studies in Philosophy of Science 20, ed. Alan C. Love and William C. Wimsatt (Minnesota, 2019), in press.

  4. When Condensed-Matter Physics Became King.” Physics Today 72, no. 1 (2019): 30–37.

  5. Conflict of Interest Mitigation Procedures May Have Little Influence on the Perceived Procedural Fairness of Risk-Related Research.” Co-authored with John C. Besley (first author), Nagwan Zahry, Kevin C. Elliott, Aaron M. McCright, and Norbert E. Kaminski. Risk Analysis 39, no. 3 (2019): 571–85.

  6. Seitz, Frederick.” In American National Biography, ed. Susan Ware (Oxford, 2018).

  7. Prestige Asymmetry in American Physics: Aspirations, Applications, and the Purloined Letter Effect.” Science in Context 30, no. 4 (2017): 475–506.

  8. Perceived Conflict of Interest in Health Science Partnerships.” Co-authored with John C. Besley (first author), Aaron M. McCright, Kevin C. Elliott, Nagwan Zahry, and Norbert E. Kaminski. PLoS ONE 12, no. 4 (2017): e0175643.

  9. Resource Letter HCMP-1: History of Condensed Matter Physics.” American Journal of Physics 85, no. 2 (2017): 87–97.

  10. The Peaceful Atom Comes to Campus.” Physics Today 69, no. 2 (2016): 40–46.

  11. Nuclear, High Energy, and Solid State Physics.” In The Blackwell Companion to the History of American Science, ed. Georgina M. Montgomery and Mark A. Largent, 186–98. Blackwell, 2016.

  12. Fundamental Disputations: The Philosophical Debates that Governed American Physics, 1939–1993.” Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 45, no. 5 (2015): 703–57.

  13. What’s in a Name Change? Solid State Physics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Materials Science.” Physics in Perspective 17, no. 1 (2015): 3–32.

  14. Evaluating Hidden Costs of Technological Change: Scaffolding, Agency, and Entrenchment.” Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 19, no. 1 (2015): 1–25.

  15. Is the Contingentist/Inevitabilist Debate a Matter of Degrees?Philosophy of Science 80, no. 5 (2013): 919–30.

Edited Volumes

  1. Between Making and Knowing: The History of Tools in Materials Research, WSPC Encyclopedia of the Development and History of Materials Science, vol. 1. Singapore: World Scientific, in press. Co-editor with Cyrus Mody.

  2. “Emerging Prospects for History of the Physical Sciences.” Special issue of Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 46, no. 3 (2016). Co-editor with Amy A. Fisher.

  3. “Making the History of Physics Dirtier: Solid State Physics in the Twentieth Century.” Special issue of Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 45, no. 5 (2015). Co-editor with Michel Janssen

Reviews and Commentaries

  1. “What Is the Value of History of Science for Philosophy of Science?,” Communiqué: Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science 100 (Summer 2019): in press. Co-authored with Agnes Bolinska.

  2. The Experimenter’s Redress.” H-Sci-Tech-Med, H-Net Reviews, June 2018. [Review: Jon Butterworth, Most Wanted Particle: The Inside Story of the Hunt for the Higgs, the Heart of the Future of Physics. The Experiment, 2015.]

  3. Truth with a Vengeance.” Science 360, no. 6391 (25 May 2018): 864. [Review: Errol Morris, The Ashtray (Or the Man Who Denied Reality) (Chicago, 2018).]

  4. Who Owns the Twentieth Century? (And Is It Worth Owning?).” Isis 108, no. 1 (2017): 149–57. [Essay review: Stephen G. Brush with Ariel Segal, Making 20th Century Science: How Theories became Knowledge (Oxford, 2015) and Jon Agar, Science in the 20th Century and Beyond (Wiley, 2012)].

  5. A Paean to Contingency.” Metascience 25, no. 3 (2016): 437–41. [Essay review: Léna Soler, Emiliano Trizio, and Andrew Pickering, eds., Science as it Could Have Been: Discussing the Contingency/Inevitability Problem (Pittsburgh, 2015)].

  6. Special Issue Introduction: Emerging Prospects for History of the Physical Sciences.” Co-authored with Amy A. Fisher. Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 46, no. 3 (2016): 261–69.

  7. New Straw for the Old Broom.” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54 (2015): 138–43. [Refereed essay review: Jimena Canales, The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate that Changed Our Understanding of Time (Princeton, 2015)].

  8. Beyond the Crystal Maze: Twentieth-Century Physics from the Vantage Point of Solid State Physics.” Special Issue Introduction. Co-authored with Michel Janssen. Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 45, no. 5 (2015): 631–40.

  9. To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science, by Steven Weinberg and In the Light of Science: Our Ancient Quest for Knowledge and the Measure of Modern Physics by Demetris Nicolaides.” Physics Today 68, no. 4 (2015): 53–54.

  10. Linnda R. Caporael, James R. Griesemer, and William C. Wimsatt (eds.): Developing Scaffolds in Evolution, Culture, and Cognition.” Acta Biotheoretica 62, no. 4 (2014): 531–35.

  11. Quinn, Terry J., From Artefacts to Atoms: The BIPM and the Search for Ultimate Measurement Standards.” American Physical Society Forum on the History of Physics Newsletter 11, no. 6 (2012): 10.

  12. Cooper, Leon N. and Dmitri Feldman, eds., BCS: 50 Years.” American Physical Society Forum on the History of Physics Newsletter 11, no. 5 (2011): 10–12.

Popular Writing

  1. El estado sólido y el nuevo mapa de la física.” Investigación y Ciencia, June 2019. (Translated by Xavier Roqué)

  2. People Don’t Trust Scientific Research When Companies Are Involved.” The Conversation, 8 May 2017. Co-authored with John Besley, Aaron McCright, Kevin Elliott, and Nagwan Zahry. https://theconversation.com/people-dont-trust-scientific-research-when-companies-are-involved-76848.

  3. The Desertron (or, If You Want It in Idaho, the Potatotron).” WorldofTrons.com, 3 March 2017. http://www.worldoftrons.com/blog/2017/2/28/the-desertron-or-if-you-want-it-in-idaho-the-potatotron-a-guest-blog-by-joseph-martin.

Oral History Interviews

  1. Mildred Dresselhaus, 24 June 2014, deposited at the Niels Bohr Library and Archives, American Institute of Physics.

  2. George O. Zimmerman, 23 June 2014, deposited at the Niels Bohr Library and Archives, American Institute of Physics.


FELLOWSHIPS, GRANTS, & AWARDS

  1. STS Scholars Award: Industrial Patronage and the Cold War University, National Science Foundation, Award #1632601, 2017–2018

  2. Non-Stipendiary Visiting Fellowship, School of Philosophy, Religion, and History of Science, University of Leeds, 2016–2017

  3. Collaborative Grant Award (with Kevin Elliott, John Besley, Norbert Kaminski, Aaron McCright, and Cheryl Murphy), Michigan State University, 2015–2016

  4. Grant-in-Aid for Oral History, American Institute of Physics, Center for History of Physics, Summer 2014

  5. Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowship, University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center, Summer 2013

  6. Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship, University of Minnesota Graduate School, Hosted by the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science, 2012–2013

  7. Dissertation Writing Fellowship, Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science, 2011–2012

  8. Research Travel Grant, Chemical Heritage Foundation, Summer 2011

  9. Thesis Research Grant, University of Minnesota, Graduate School, 2010–2011

  10. John C. Slater Fellowship, American Philosophical Society, Summer 2010

  11. Edwin T. Layton Award for outstanding contributions to undergraduate teaching by a Teaching Assistant, University of Minnesota, HSTM, 2009–2010

  12. Grant-in-Aid for History of Modern Physics, American Institute of Physics, Center for History of Physics, Summer 2009

  13. Summer Research Grant, University of Minnesota, HSTM, Summer 2009

  14. Roger H. Stuewer Fellowship (Fall) and Program Fellowship (Spring), University of Minnesota, HSTM, 2007–2008

EDITORIAL ROLES

Physics in Perspective
Co-Editor-in-Chief, 2019–
Managing Editor, 2016–2018
Assistant Editor, March–December 2015

Endeavour
Co-Editor-in-Chief, July 2015–December 2018
Editorial Board, January 2019–

H-PhysicalSciences
Consulting Editor, 2016–
Founder; Lead Editor, 2012–2016

 


TEACHING                     

Areas of Teaching Competence
History: US; science, technology; biology, chemistry, and physics; environment; methods
Philosophy: science; technology; physical sciences; biology; epistemology; ethics
Interdisciplinary: Science, Technology, and Society; History and Philosophy of Science

Certification
Certificate of Teaching in Higher Education, Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Minnesota, completed 2011

Introductory and Survey Courses
Science, Medicine, and Technology since 1900 (Cambridge)
Course manager, lecturer, and supervisor in survey of the modern period; coordinated course teaching, delivered ten of twenty lectures, conducted one-on-one supervisions, set examination questions, evaluated examinations.

Modern Medicine and Life Sciences (Cambridge)
Course manager and lecturer in survey of modern biology and medicine; coordinating course teaching, delivering eight of thirty-two lectures, setting examination questions, evaluating examinations. (Planned for 2018–2019)

Laboratories and Disciplines (Cambridge)
Lecturer in topical survey of the role of laboratories and disciplines in organizing scientific work; delivered three of six lectures, set examination questions, evaluated examinations.

Technology, Society, and Values (Cambridge)
Four-lecture sequence within the “Ethics and Politics of Science, Technology and Medicine” course on the history and philosophy of technology; delivered lectures, set examination questions, evaluated examinations. (Planned for 2018–2019)

Introduction to HPS/STS (MSU/Colby)
Concepts, topics, and methods in history and philosophy of science/science, technology, and society disciplines: foundations of knowledge; race and gender; policy and law; experiment and practice; funding and patronage; ethics.

Science and American Culture (Minnesota)
Upper-level survey covering topics from Native American views and interactions with nature to late-twentieth century scientific controversies.

Technology and American Culture (Minnesota)
Upper-level survey; topics from colonial technologies to the internet. Included excursions to the Bakken Museum and Wangensteen Library and guest lectures by technology professionals.

Revolutions in Science: Lavoisier, Darwin, and Einstein (Minnesota)
Joint lower- and upper-level undergraduate survey of modern chemistry, biology, and physics.

Original Topical Courses
The Superconducting Super Collider (Cambridge)
Primary source seminar built around the US congressional hearings on the SSC. Delivered four seminars and supervised student research papers in one-on-one supervisions. (Planned for 2018–2019)

Cybernetics (Cambridge)
Primary source seminar built around the proceedings of the Macy conferences on cybernetics. Delivered four seminars and supervised student research papers in one-on-one supervisions.

Engineering Armageddon: Visions of Scientific Apocalypse (Colby; MSU)
Cultural responses to science and technology through literature, in intellectual and social context; incorporates course-specific teaching exhibits at local art museums.

Scientists Behaving Badly: The History of Scientific Misconduct (MSU)
Boundaries and definitions of scientific legitimacy and illegitimacy from Victorian England to modern America.

History and Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (MSU)
Topics include space and time, optics, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, reduction and emergence, ethics, and politics.
 

Research Seminars
Contingency, Counterfactuals, and Causation (Cambridge)
Masters-level lecture and research seminar in the history and philosophy of science. Delivered lecture with accompanying discussion and oversaw research papers based on it in one-on-one supervisions.

Senior Project Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society (Colby)
Yearlong undergraduate senior thesis seminar, with honors option; research methods in STS disciplines, writing, and revision.

Natural Environment: Climate Change (MSU)
Honors undergraduate research seminar; topics and research methods in the history, philosophy, and sociology of climate change.


PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS                                                                        

Invited Presentations

  1. “Mildred Dresselhaus and Solid State Pedagogy at MIT.”
    a. AIP Center for History of Physics, College Park, MD, 27 July 2018.
    b. American Association of Physics Teachers, Washington, DC, 30 July 2018.

  2. “How Physics Became ‘What Physicists Do’: The Solid State Community and the Identity of American Physics.” “Weak” and “Strong” Knowledge in Solid State Physics and the Material Sciences, Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main, May 5–7, 2018.

  3. “Training Physicists for Industry: Skills versus Foundations in Postwar Physics Pedagogy.” Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil, 3 August 2017.

  4. “What If Bergson Won?” Panel: The Author in Dialogue: Jimena Canales, The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate That Changed Our Understanding of Time. American Physical Society, New Orleans, LA, 13 March 2017.

  5. Panelist, Roundtable on The History Manifesto, University of Puget Sound, Science, Technology, and Society, 1 March 2017.

  6. “Rethinking Industrial Patronage of Academic Research in the Early Cold War.” Chemical Heritage Foundation, Philadelphia, PA, 27 February 2017.

  7. “Before New Big Science: Alfred O. C. Nier and the Resurrection of Mass Spectrometry.” American Physical Society, Washington, DC, 28–31 January 2017.

  8. “Twentieth-Century Physicists as Natural Philosophers.” Commentary on panel: Quantum Mechanics and the Philosophy of Nature. Third Biennial Early-Career Conference for Historians of the Physical Sciences, Annapolis, MD, 6–10 April 2016.

  9. The Diversification of Physics in Postwar America: Topical and Professional Factors.” Workshop for Theorists at Undergraduate Institutions, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 22 June–2 July 2015.

  10. “‘Scientists Are Worse than Other Professors’: Science and Morality at Robert Maynard Hutchins’s University of Chicago.” Colby College, Science, Technology, and Society, 21 November 2014.

  11. “Evaluating Hidden Costs of Technological Change.” Beyond the Meme: Articulating Dynamic Structures in Cultural Evolution, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, 16–19 October 2014.

  12. “The Road to Stockholm Is Paved with Condensed Matter.” Second Annual Physics Nobel Celebration, American Institute of Physics, College Park, MD, 6 October 2014.

  13. “A Good Name and Great Riches: Rebranding Solid State Physics in the National Labs.”
    a. Panel: Pais Prize Session for Lillian Hoddeson. American Physical Society, Atlanta, GA, 31 March–3 April 2012.
    b. Chemical Heritage Foundation, Philadelphia, PA, 6 March 2012.

Invited Presentations at Home Institution

  1. “Mildred Dresselhaus and Solid State Pedagogy at MIT.” Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 21 May 2019.

  2. “Who Made the Makers?: How Materials Science Happened.” AD HOC, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, 15 May 2019.

  3. “When Condensed Matter Physics became King.” Trinity College, University of Cambridge, Science Society Symposium, 10 March 2019.

  4. “Negotiating History: Contingency, Canonicity, and Case Studies.” CamPoS, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, 30 January 2019. Presented with Agnes Bolinska.

  5. “Lessons from Past Technological Transitions.” Policy Workshop: Future Threats and Challenges of Quantum Technologies, Centre for Science and Policy, University of Cambridge, 4 December 2018.

  6. “Five Ways AI Is Not Like the Manhattan Project (and One Way It Is).” Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, University of Cambridge, 25 June 2018.

  7. “A Discrete History of the Quantum.” Centre for Science and Policy, University of Cambridge, 9 March 2018.

  8. “What Isn’t Science?” Darwin Society Dinner Lecture, Christ’s College, University of Cambridge, 5 March 2018.

  9. “Prestige Asymmetry in the Recent History of Physics: Aspirations, Applications, and the Purloined Letter Effect.” Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, Brown Bag Lecture Series, 6 December 2016.

  10. “Rethinking Industrial Patronage of Academic Research in the Early Cold War.” Centre for History and Philosophy of Science Work-in-Progress Seminar, University of Leeds, Leeds UK, 18 October 2016.

  11. “What Don’t We Know about Industry-Academia Relations in Cold War America?” Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine Introductory Symposium, Philadelphia, PA, 28 September 2016.

  12. “What Does It Mean for Physics to Be Fundamental?” Michigan State University, Physics Department, 17 February 2016.

  13. “Rethinking Industrial Patronage of Academic Research.” Michigan State University, Science and Society at State Workshop, 17 April 2015.

  14. “What We Learn about Science, Religion, and Censorship from Galileo's ‘Letter to Grand Duchess Christina.’” Colby College Seminar Series: Galileo Turns 450, Waterville, ME, 12 March 2014.

  15. “When Physicists Disagree about the Fundamentals.” Colby College Physics Department, Senior Seminar Series, Waterville, ME, 28 October 2013.

  16. “Solid Foundations: Structuring American Solid State Physics, 1939–1993.” Doctoral Research Showcase, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 9 April 2013.

  17. “Why Should Historians Care about Solid State Physics?” Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science Introductory Symposium, Philadelphia, PA, 30 September 2011.

Selected Conference Presentations and Panels ({•} indicates panel organizer)

  1. “Negotiating History: Contingency, Canonicity, and Case Studies.” (With Agnes Bolinska)
    a. Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 1–3 June 2019.
    b. British Society for the Philosophy of Science, University of Durham, Durham, UK, 17–19 July 2019.
    c. 16th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic, 5–10 August 2019.

  2. “Tools for Characterizing Materials.” Panel: Materials Research and Its Toolkit. Co-organized with Cyrus Mody.
    a. History of Science Society, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 23–27 July 2019.
    b. 12th International Conference on the History of Chemistry, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands, 29 July–2 August 2019.

  3. “Who Was Physics For?: Companies, Combatants, Countries, and Colleagues.” Joint 3rd International Conference on the History of Physics of the European Physical Society, San Sebastian, Spain, 17–21 October 2018.

  4. “When Condensed Matter Physics Became King.” IOP History of Physics Meeting, London, England, 27 September 2018.

  5. “Before New Big Science.” European Society for the History of Science, London, England, 14–17 September 2018.

  6. {•} “The Phoenix Project at the Science-Industry Nexus.” Panel: Nuclear Science and Engineering in the Michigan Memorial–Phoenix Project. Society for the History of Technology, Philadelphia, PA, 26–29 October 2017. Co-organized with David Munns, Edna Suárez Diaz, and Gisela Mateos.

  7. “Why Are We Surprised that Technology Drove Quantum Theory?: How the Reductionist Worldview Shaped the Historiography of Quantum Physics and What We Should Do about It.” 25th International Congress of History of Science and Technology, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 23–29 July 2017.

  8. “Prestige Asymmetry in the Recent History of Physics: Aspirations, Applications, and the Purloined Letter Effect.” Columbia History of Science Group, Friday Harbor, WA, 3–4 March 2017.

  9. “In the Shadow of the Atom: The University of Chicago’s Institute for the Study of Metals.” 10th Laboratory History Conference, Washington, DC, 27 January 2017.

  10. “Operation Phoenix: Industry, Memory, and Nuclear Science at the University of Michigan, 1946–1960.” History of Science Society, Atlanta, GA, 4 November 2016.

  11. “The Purloined Letter Effect: Prestige Asymmetry in the History of Science.” Science in Public 2016, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK, 13 July 2016.

  12. {•} Chair, Panel: Steven Weinberg’s To Explain the World: The Author in Dialogue. American Physical Society, Baltimore, MD, 14 March 2016. Co-organized with Alan Chodos and Robert P. Crease.

  13. {•} “The Simple and Courageous Course: Industrial Patronage of Basic Research at the University of Chicago, 1945–1951.” Panel: Technological Systems Large and Small: Physics and Industry in Postwar America. History of Science Society, San Francisco, CA, 20 November 2015. Co-organized with Amy A. Fisher.

  14. {•} Roundtable: Biography and the History of the Physical Sciences. History of Science Society, San Francisco, CA, 20 November 2015. Co-organized with Amy A. Fisher.

  15. “Operation Phoenix: The University of Michigan in the Age of Invincible Surmise.” 9th Laboratory History Conference, Albuquerque, NM, 11 October 2015.

  16. “A Paean to Messiness.” Commentary on the Panel: Scaffolding Werner Callebaut’s Naturalistic Turn. International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology, Montréal, Quebec, 7 July 2015.

  17. {•} Panelist, “Historians of Science Watching ‘Cosmos’: Interpretive Challenges and Teaching Opportunities.” History of Science Society, Chicago, IL, 8 November 2014. Co-organized with Kristin Johnson.

  18. Panelist, “Workshop: The Past, Present, and Future of the Physical Sciences.” History of Science Society, Boston, MA, 22 November 2013.

  19. “Using Cultural Scaffolding to Assess and Manage Technological Change.” Pressing Issues: The History of Technology Meets Public Policy, Colby College, 7 October 2013.

  20. “Scaffolding, Agency, and Technology: A Framework for Evaluating Technological Change.” 18th International Conference of the Society for Philosophy and Technology, Lisbon, Portugal, 4 July 2013.

  21. “How Physics Became ‘What Physicists Do’: Defining a Discipline by Convention in the 1940s.” Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of the Physical Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, 11 May 2013.

  22. {•} Chair and Discussant, Panel: A History of Physics in Industry, American Physical Society, Forum on History of Physics session, Baltimore, MD, 20 March 2013.

  23. “Is the Contingentist/Inevitabilist Debate a Matter of Degrees?” Philosophy of Science Association, San Diego, CA, 15 November 2012.

  24. “Anderson, Weinberg, and the SSC: Contesting ‘Fundamental’ Physics in a Public Policy Context.” 8th Laboratory History Conference, Atlanta, GA, 31 March 2012.

  25. {•} “Fundamental Disputations: How Philosophical Debates Structured Solid State Physics.” Panel: Solid State Science in the Twentieth Century: Major Trends through a New Lens. History of Science Society, Cleveland, OH, 4 November 2011.

  26. Panelist, “Roundtable Discussion: Whither the History of the Physical Sciences?” Continuity and Discontinuity in the Physical Sciences since the Enlightenment, American Institute of Physics, Center for History of Physics, 31 July 2011.

  27. “The National Magnet Laboratory and the Maturation of Solid State Physics.” 7th Laboratory History Conference, Leuven, Belgium, 8 June 2011.

  28. “Balkanizing Physics: Division vs. Unity and the Establishment of American Solid State Physics in the 1940s.” History of Science Society, Montréal, Quebec, 5 November 2010.

  29. “Fundamentality and the Role of Philosophy in Later Twentieth Century Physics.” International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science (HOPOS), Central European University, Budapest, Hungary, 24 June 2010.


SERVICE

Professional Service

At-Large Member, 2013–2015; Vice-Chair, 2018–2019; Chair, 2019–2020, Executive Committee, American Physical Society, Forum on the History of Physics

Member, Historic Sites Committee, American Physical Society, Member 2017–2019

Member, History Programs Task Force on Professional Standards and Operations, American Institute of Physics, Center for History of Physics/Niels Bohr Library and Archives, Member 2016–2018

Co-Convener, Physical Sciences Working Group, Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, 2015–

Member, Program Committee, American Physical Society, Forum on History of Physics, Member, 2012–2013; 2015–2016

Member, Advisory Committee, American Institute of Physics, Center for History of Physics/Niels Bohr Library and Archives, Member, 2014–2016

Charter Member, Steering Committee, History of Science Society, Physical Sciences Forum, 2012–2016

Member, Organizing Committee, “Continuity and Discontinuity in the Physical Sciences,” American Institute of Physics, College Park, MD, Member, 28–31 July 2011.

Institutional Service

Co-manager, MPhil Programme, University of Cambridge, HPS, 2018–2019

Member, CSaP Network, Centre for Science and Policy, University of Cambridge, 2018–

Member, Teaching Committee, University of Cambridge, HPS, 2017–2019

Graduate Training Officer, University of Cambridge, HPS, 2017–2019

Ordinary Examiner (undergraduate), University of Cambridge, HPS, 2017–2019

Co-convener, Philosophy and History of Physics Reading Group, University of Cambridge, HPS, 2017–2019

Co-organizer, Twentieth Century Think Tank, University of Cambridge, 2017–2019

Faculty Advisor, MSU AIESEC Chapter, Michigan State University, 2016

Faculty Co-Convener, HPS Graduate Reading Group, Michigan State University, 2016

Seminar Series Coordinator, Science, Technology, and Society, Colby College, 2013–2014

Faculty Facilitator, Reuman Reading Group, Philosophy, Colby College, 2013–2014

Member, Advisory Committee, “Pressing Issues: The History of Technology Meets Public Policy,” A Goldfarb Center Faculty-Sponsored International Conference, Colby College, 2013

Graduate Student Liaison to the Faculty, HSTM, University of Minnesota, 2009–2010. 


Last updated July 2019